Should we change our attitude about stress?

I love TED talks (TED stands for Technology, Entertainment and Design, in case you’ve ever wondered, like I have). I mean, even if I’m not even mildly interested in the TED topic under discussion, I watch the video anyway, sometimes, because I always learn something. And learning new things is exercise for the brain, right? Plus, truth be told, I’m a curious gal…and my curiosity, in fact, has probably saved my life, certainly my quality of life…so curiosity can be very good (even though it apparently, er, “killed the cat,” eh ūüėČ ).¬†

Often, though, the TED topics are relevant, relevant to us myeloma folks, I mean. The TED talk I’m about to introduce is a case in point. First, though, I need to thank Julie for sending me the link to this talk on STRESS.

Ah, yes, stress.

I’ve always maintained here on the blog, that stress is bad for us. Very VERY bad. This is based on what I have read about the stress hormone norepinephrine, which is involved in myeloma progression, according to a study published in 2008, a study that we should all know from top to bottom, a study that I’ve posted about, and referred to, numerous times here on the blog… (see my Page on myeloma and stress, on the right).¬†

But what if stress were actually NOT so bad for us? What if we found out that what is bad for us is actually our ATTITUDE about stress? 

According to¬†Stanford University psychologist Kelly McGonigal, if you BELIEVE that stress is bad for you, you are at more risk of…dying. Yes, dying. No kidding. Simply by having the wrong attitude toward stress…

And then she asks the question: can changing the way we think about stress make us healthier? The science says YES, she answers. 

Yes?

Could that be possible?

Without further ado, here’s the link to Kelly’s fascinating TED talk. It’s less than 15 minutes long, so it won’t take up much of your time…and it may change your attitude/s toward stress and make you lead a healthier, happier life…¬†

Now I am really curious to read the University of Buffalo study that Kelly refers to in the second half of her lecture…I want to learn more about this “attitude about stress” business, because that myeloma-stress study has always been in the back of my mind, so I want more information…

One thing is for sure, though: I’m going to start changing the way I feel about stress…I mean, it can’t hurt…and it could possibly give a boost to my impaired immune system, which is always more than welcome…

Anyway, this video is a totally fascinating…I highly recommend it:¬†http://goo.gl/EbJpxG¬†

Besides, where else are you going to learn about the “cuddle” hormone? Hehe.¬†

2 Comments

  1. I had such an epiphany yesterday – wrote a thank you on the CarePages blog updating friends/family on one year post-SCT, thanking them – the TED video let me understand why I felt so grateful to these people (who listened to me so long in the early and worst situations). After all, they were “there” to support Van and I’m the one who actually reaped the benefits because I posted, I read replies, etc – how had they helped either of us?? Well, by listening. I think the big dose of oxytocin for ME created a ripple effect for HIM. My gratitude is overwhelming.

  2. Margaret, that video sure hit home today. I was sort of stressed out, alone, Sunday, you know the story. so I got myself up, and visited a friend who is in a much worse situation and held her hand, then I fed the birds and watered some plants outside. I felt better about life, thanks to you. Beatrice

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