Important update on the MRI contrast agent gadolinium…

Do you remember my post on gadolinium? If not, here it is: http://margaret.healthblogs.org/2009/12/13/the-gadolinium-used-in-mris-makes-myeloma-cells-proliferate/ (there is also a corresponding Page, which you can find by scrolling down my Page section on the right). Well, today, thanks to a blog reader (see previous post, comment # 5), we have an interesting gadolinium update: http://goo.gl/nKdMz Like the ASH 2009 study discussed in…

Continue reading →

MRIs and gadolinium

(Oldest posts first…please scroll down for updates) December 13 2009 post. A friend of mine, who has just had his second autologous stem cell transplant here in Italy, wrote me a note this morning about a paper presented at the recent ASH meeting on gadolinium, which is used as a contrast agent in MRIs. The…

Continue reading →

GOOD OR BAD FOR MULTIPLE MYELOMA? THIS IS A HELP PAGE WITH LINKS…

(For details/blog reader comments, please see my June 26 2011 post: http://margaret.healthblogs.org/2011/06/26/good-or-bad-for-myeloma-that-is-the-question%e2%80%a6/). [This is a work in progress…suggestions much appreciated…thanks!] Last month, a blog reader, = a research scientist with myeloma, suggested that I create some sort of “master listing” that would make it easier for readers to locate stuff. Good idea. I’ve realized for some time now that…

Continue reading →

Virus connection to myeloma (?)

Most recent post first: April 14 2013 post. Epstein Barr, or infectious mononucleosis. Here we go again. It’s been ages since I last wrote about a possible viral connection to the insurgence of MGUS…At one point, a few years ago, I even had the brilliant (?) idea of asking you all to let me know if…

Continue reading →

Why poke a sleeping tiger?

A friend (thank you!) sent me a case study last week. You can view the abstract here: http://goo.gl/baWTd It actually turns out to be quite a bit more than a case study, as we will see… Without further ado, let’s hop right into the full study. The central character, in this first part, is a healthy…

Continue reading →